Roof Pitch

Roofers and architects know all about roof pitch, but the way it’s expressed often seems confusing to some people. If you are a building owner and you want to understand what these professionals are talking about, we have the simple lowdown for you.

Why Roof Pitch Matters

The pitch of your roof is important for a couple of reasons. First of all, it’s used to estimate the amount of material for the job. Secondly, you need to know the pitch to know what kind of materials you can actually use on the roof. For example, Endureed synthetic that can be installed on any sloped roof that has a 2:12 or greater roof pitch.

What Does 2:12 Mean?

Pitch, angle, incline, slope are all terms used to describe the steepness of a roof. In the roofing, we like use the term “pitch” and it’s expressed in terms of 12 inches. How many inches does the roof run vertically for every 12 inches it runs horizontally?

If the height rises two inches vertically for every 12 inches of horizontal run, it  has a “2-in-12 pitch” or just a “2 pitch.”

Pitch Expressed In Degrees

Here’s a simple conversion for those of you who can imagine the degrees in an angle better than you can imagine pitch expressed the previous way.

  • 0 pitch = 0:12 = 0 degrees
  • 1 pitch = 1:12 = 4.5 degrees
  • 2 pitch = 2:12 = 9.5 degrees
  • 3 pitch = 3:12 = 14 degrees
  • 4 pitch = 4:12 = 18.5 degrees
  • 5 pitch = 5:12 = 22.5 degrees
  • 6 pitch = 6:12 = 26.5 degrees
  • 7 pitch = 7:12 = 30.5 degrees
  • 8 pitch = 8:12 = 33.75 degrees
  • 9 pitch = 9:12 = 37 degrees
  • 10 pitch = 10:12 = 40 degrees
  • 11 pitch = 11:12 = 42.5 degrees
  • 12 pitch = 12:12 = 45 degrees

Endureed Minimum Pitch

Our roofing system works for any roofs with a pitch 2:12 or greater, as mentioned above. So, for every 12 horizontal feet, the roof must drop at least two feet to install this synthetic thatch product. Still, it’s unlikely that your roof doesn’t fit this requirement. That’s a 9.5 degree slope! Of course, roofs like with very low pitches do exist. Some homes built in the 1960’s have very low pitches, for example. Industrial buildings often have a 0:12 pitch or close to it.

At least now you will understand what the professionals are talking about, if you didn’t before!